Posts Tagged: indigenous rights

Temper, Leah.“Blocking Pipelines, Unsettling Environmental Justice: From Rights of Nature to Responsibility to Territory.” Local Environment 24, no. 2 (February 2019): 94-112

In this article, Leah Temper discusses previous notions of environmental justice and possible ways to remedy the disjoints of Western ideologies and indigenous culture. She specifically studied and reports on the Unist’on’en community in Canada and their experience opposing the

Temper, Leah.“Blocking Pipelines, Unsettling Environmental Justice: From Rights of Nature to Responsibility to Territory.” Local Environment 24, no. 2 (February 2019): 94-112

In this article, Leah Temper discusses previous notions of environmental justice and possible ways to remedy the disjoints of Western ideologies and indigenous culture. She specifically studied and reports on the Unist’on’en community in Canada and their experience opposing the

Tetreault, Darcy. “Social Environmental Mining Conflicts in Mexico.” Latin American Perspectives 42, no. 5 (2015): 48-66. http://www.jstor.org/stable/24574867.

The author, Darcy Tetreault, explains how modernity and neoliberal reform/policy in Mexico have led to environmental injustice for several indigenous groups and communities. Global demand for metals, petroleum, and agricultural products, paired with global consumerism of the wealthy and middle class,

Tetreault, Darcy. “Social Environmental Mining Conflicts in Mexico.” Latin American Perspectives 42, no. 5 (2015): 48-66. http://www.jstor.org/stable/24574867.

The author, Darcy Tetreault, explains how modernity and neoliberal reform/policy in Mexico have led to environmental injustice for several indigenous groups and communities. Global demand for metals, petroleum, and agricultural products, paired with global consumerism of the wealthy and middle class,

López, Alejandra Saravia, and Adam Rua Quiroga. “An Assesment of the Environmental and Social Impacts of Chinese Trade and FDI in Bolivia.” In China and Sustainable Development in Latin America: The Social and Environmental Dimension, (2017): 147-82.

Bolivia has a deep history of international trading partnerships for the extraction of natural resources such as tin, zinc, and the mining of other materials. With the more recent incoming partnership of Chinese trade and foreign direct investment in Bolivia,

López, Alejandra Saravia, and Adam Rua Quiroga. “An Assesment of the Environmental and Social Impacts of Chinese Trade and FDI in Bolivia.” In China and Sustainable Development in Latin America: The Social and Environmental Dimension, (2017): 147-82.

Bolivia has a deep history of international trading partnerships for the extraction of natural resources such as tin, zinc, and the mining of other materials. With the more recent incoming partnership of Chinese trade and foreign direct investment in Bolivia,

Radonic, Lucero. “Environmental Violence, Water Rights, and (Un) Due Process in Northwestern Mexico.” Latin American Perspectives 42, no. 5 (2015): 27-47.

The author focuses on a case study involving the Yaqui Tribe in Sonora, Mexico to demonstrate that modern-day water rights struggles are not physically violent but are still a form of environmental violence and an erasure of indigenous human rights

Radonic, Lucero. “Environmental Violence, Water Rights, and (Un) Due Process in Northwestern Mexico.” Latin American Perspectives 42, no. 5 (2015): 27-47.

The author focuses on a case study involving the Yaqui Tribe in Sonora, Mexico to demonstrate that modern-day water rights struggles are not physically violent but are still a form of environmental violence and an erasure of indigenous human rights

“A Toxic State”: Peru’s Unfulfilled Promises to Indigenous Peoples

I chose this image because it succinctly demonstrates the inadequate health resources that are allocated for indigenous communities in Cuninico, Peru. The incomplete and unkempt health care facility in Cuninico that was never fully functional or equipped is indicative of the lack of interest for the livelihood of Indigenous communities on the part of government entities.

“A Toxic State”: Peru’s Unfulfilled Promises to Indigenous Peoples

I chose this image because it succinctly demonstrates the inadequate health resources that are allocated for indigenous communities in Cuninico, Peru. The incomplete and unkempt health care facility in Cuninico that was never fully functional or equipped is indicative of the lack of interest for the livelihood of Indigenous communities on the part of government entities.

McNeish, John-Andrew. “Extraction, Protest and Indigeneity in Bolivia: The TIPNIS Effect.” Latin American and Caribbean Ethnic Studies 8:2 (July 2013): 221-242.

Using the 2011 protests against the construction of a road through the Isobore Sécure National Park and Indigenous Territory (TIPNIS), McNeish argues that the dynamics indigeneity in Bolivia are more complex and contradictory than previous authors have claimed. Contrary to

McNeish, John-Andrew. “Extraction, Protest and Indigeneity in Bolivia: The TIPNIS Effect.” Latin American and Caribbean Ethnic Studies 8:2 (July 2013): 221-242.

Using the 2011 protests against the construction of a road through the Isobore Sécure National Park and Indigenous Territory (TIPNIS), McNeish argues that the dynamics indigeneity in Bolivia are more complex and contradictory than previous authors have claimed. Contrary to

Buen Vivir: Future or Past?

Buen vivir is an ideology that finds it origins with the indigenous people of the Ecuadorian Andes. There are other areas in South America that share similar ideologies that are placed under the umbrella of Buen Vivir. In 2008, this

Buen Vivir: Future or Past?

Buen vivir is an ideology that finds it origins with the indigenous people of the Ecuadorian Andes. There are other areas in South America that share similar ideologies that are placed under the umbrella of Buen Vivir. In 2008, this