Fregoso, Rosa-Linda. “‘¡Las Queremos Vivas!’: La Política Y Cultura De Los Derechos Humanos.” Debate Feminista 39 (2009): 209-43. Accessed April 16, 2015. http://www.jstor.org/stable/i40097598.

This picture from Google Images displays one of the ways that community members have chosen to commemorate the victims.  As mentioned in the bibliography, members of the communities in Ciudad Juárez seek to voice the issue of femicide in their country and have done so in different ways.  The pink crosses with the victims’ names written across serve as a constant reminder for those who see them of the injustices several women have faced in the city.

In recent years, Ciudad Juárez has been one of the focal points in Mexico’s drug war because of the Juárez cartel. However, Ciudad Juárez has also been one of the cities affected by femicide in Mexico. Through her piece, Fregoso demonstrates how a shift in Mexico’s economic goals and corruption within the government has affected the protection of Ciudad Juárez’s population and how the community has attempted to achieve justice for the victims.  Fregoso explains that as Mexico’s government has chosen to pursue a neoliberal path, there has been a decline in a variety of social services and the protection of the people.  She explains that not a lot has been done within the political realm to end femicide.  As a result, there has been an increase in the number of social groups attempting to gain justice and present femicide not only as an issue affecting woman, but as one affecting everyone globally.  Fregoso also brings to light the transformation in Mexico’s culture as artists merge art with religious symbols in order to represent the murder of countless women.  Fregoso believes that such a mergence will lead to stronger unity within Mexico’s community.

Having written other pieces that deal with femicide in Mexico, Freogso is able to demonstrate her familiarization with the topic through her observations of Ciudad Juárez and statistical data.  Fregoso provides statistical information about the number of women murdered as to better demonstrate the lack of justice for the victims.  In addition, the lack of concern seen on behalf of Mexico’s government work well to introduce the various social groups that have arisen as a result in hopes of achieving a transformation in society.

Fregoso’s piece will be useful in showing the political and social impact that femicide has had on Mexico in a various ways. The piece allows the reader to better understand the relationship between Mexico’s government and its community, in addition to explaining the effect of neoliberalism in Mexico. It also demonstrates another key aspect which has been the emergence of groups such as Voces sin Eco and their goal to voice the murders in Ciudad Juárez. All of which relate directly to the themes in the course such as the defending of human rights and political corruption.

This picture from Google Images displays one of the ways that community members have chosen to commemorate the victims. As mentioned in the bibliography, members of the communities in Ciudad Juárez seek to voice the issue of femicide in their country and have done so in different ways. The pink crosses with the victims’ names written across serve as a constant reminder for those who see them of the injustices several women have faced in the city.

Tags: Femicide, Mexico, Women, Ciudad Juárez

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